Orchestra

Ludwig van Beethoven
Sinfonie Nr. 3 „Eroica“ | Sinfonie Nr. 5
Stuttgarter Philharmoniker | Gabriel Feltz

catalog number: 21088

The Third and Fifth symphonies do not each include the discursive spirit so typical for Beethoven, moreover they seem, in some way, to communicate with one another. In the “Eroica” the four movements are all independent and very different, whereas the individual movements of the Fifth are connected by the ‘knocking motif’ which appears in differing form, but is always clear and meaningful. Looked at in this way both works represent two differing answers by Beethoven to the question which is posed in each musical epoch as to what actually constitutes a symphony.

 

Gustav Mahler 
Symphony  Nr. 1 - Gabriel FeltzGustav Mahler 
Symphony  Nr. 1
Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra
Gabriel Feltz

Catalog number: 21082 

Gabriel Feltz began recording all of Gustav Mahler's symphonies with the Stuttgart Philharmonic in 2007. The edition so far includes the Symphonies 1, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 and will be completed in 2016. The recordings have been internationally acclaimed. The internet critic “infodad.com“ called it the “most unusual and controversial cycle of the last few years.“

 

Luigi Nono - Intolleranza 1960Luigi Nono
Intolleranza 1960

One-act opera in two parts
German translation by Alfred Andersch

Libretto with texts of Angelo Maria Rippelino, Julius Fucik, Jean-Paul Sartre, Paul Eluard, Wladimir Majakowskij, Henri Alleg and Bertolt Brecht

Wolfgang Neumann
Maria Kowollik
Judy Berry
Ina Schlingensiepen
Armin Kolarczyk
Bartholomeus Driessen

Bremen Philharmonic Orchestra
Bremen Theatre Choir
Conducted by Gabriel Feltz

Intolleranza 1960 was Luigi Nono's first work for the opera stage and is a flaming protest against intolerance and oppression and the violation of human dignity. The year in the title refers to the time of the work's origin. It was commissioned for the 1969 Venice Biennale by its director Mario Labroca. The first performance was conducted by Bruno Maderna on 13 April 1961 at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice. The premiere was disrupted by neo-fascists, who shouted "Viva la polizia" during the torture scene. Nono's opponents accused him of poisoning Italian music.
A co-production with
Radio Bremen.

Diapason_dOR

 

"Diapason d'Or" 

 

Gustav Mahler
Symphony Nr.4

Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra
Jeannette Wernecke, Soprano
Gabriel Feltz

Catalog number 21072

“… What I was attempting here was exceedingly difficult to realize. Imagine the uniform blue of the skies, which is more difficult to paint than all changing and contrasting shades. This is the fundamental mood of the whole. Only sometimes it darkens and becomes ghostly, gruesome. But heaven itself is not darkened; it shines on in an eternal blue. Only to us it suddenly seems gruesome, just as on the most beautiful day in the woods, flooded with light, we are often gripped by a panic and fear. The Scherzo is mystical, confused and eerie so that your hair will stand on end. But in the following Adagio you will soon see that things were not so bad - everything is resolved.”

(Gustav Mahler in a letter to his friend Natalie Bauer-Lechner, 1900)

 

Gustav Mahler
Symphony Nr.3

Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra
Gabriel Feltz

Catalog number 21065

"A highly exciting performance in which Feltz, from the first bar to the last, succeeded in transposing the ever-changing, almost mountainously craggy and often hard-cut material into a pulsing flow of sound. The Philharmoniker were at their very best: Wonderful, the range of dynamics, from a whispering quadruple pianissimo right up to a raging thunder. Magnificent, the realisation of the abruptly contrasting characters. Divine, the transparent melodiousness of the strings in the profound and thoughtfully-flowing finale." 
Verena Großkreutz, Esslinger Zeitung

 
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